Music Teaching and Learning

Our group studies the interactions between teachers and learners that lead to meaningful changes in learners' thinking, behavior, and attitudes. We employ a variety of approaches in an effort to understand the variables that contribute to effecting and maintaining changes in the the contexts of group and individual instruction.

We are also interested how learners create lasting changes in their own behavior—how musicians think and behave during individual practice.

CML Lab Members

Doctoral Students

Lab Alumni

Other Collaborators

Recent papers

Duke, R. A. (2012). Their own best teachers: How we help and hinder the development of learners' independence. Music Educators Journal, 99(2), 36-41. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., & Byo, J. L. (2012). Building musicianship in the instrumental music classroom. In G. McPherson and G. Welch (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Music Teaching and Learning (pp. 712-730). London: Oxford University Press.

Duke, R. A., & Chapman, D. (2011). Changing learners: The nature of expertise in music teaching. In P. Madura (Ed.), Advances in Social-Psychology and Music Education Research. New York: Routledge. 

Duke, R. A., Simmons, A. L., & Cash, C. D. (2009). It's not how much; it's how. Characteristics of practice behavior and retention of performance skills. Journal of Research in Music Education, 56, 310-321. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., & Buckner, J. J. (2009). Watching learners learn. MTNA e-Journal, 1, 17-28. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., & Simmons, A. L. (2006). The nature of expertise: Narrative descriptions of 19 common elements observed in the lessons of three renowned artist-teachers. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 170, 7-19. [pdf]

Maynard, L. M. (2006). The role of repetition in the practice sessions of artist teachers and their students. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 167, 61-72. [pdf]

Taylor, D. M. (2006). Refining learned repertoire for percussion instruments in an elementary setting. Journal of Research in Music Education, 54, 231-243. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., & Benson, C. L. (2004). Steering from the caboose: Setting the pace of group piano instruction according to the least skilled students in the class. Update: Applications of Research in Music Education, 23(1), 41-53.

Cavitt, M. E. (2003). A descriptive analysis of error correction in instrumental music rehesearsals. Journal of Research in Music Education, 51, 218-230. [pdf]

Henninger, J. C. (2002). The effects of knowledge of instructional goals on observations of teaching and learning. Journal of Research in Music Education, 50, 75-87. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., & Henninger, J. C. (2002). Teachers’ verbal corrections and observers’ perceptions of teaching and learning. Journal of Research in Music Education, 50, 37-50. [pdf]

Colprit, E. J. (2000). Observation and analysis of Suzuki string teaching. Journal of Research in Music Education, 48, 206-221. [pdf]

Duke, R. A. (2000). Measures of instructional effectiveness in music research. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 143, 1-48. [pdf]

Duke. R. A. (1999). Teacher and student behavior in Suzuki string lessons: Results from the International Research Symposium on Talent Education. Journal of Research in Music Education, 47, 293-307. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., & Henninger, J. C. (1998). Effects of verbal corrections on student attitude and performance. Journal of Research in Music Education, 46, 482-495. [pdf]

Duke, R. A., Prickett, C. A., & Jellison, J. A. (1998). Empirical description of the pace of music instruction. Journal of Research in Music Education, 46, 265-280. [pdf]

Siebenaler, D. J. (1997). Analysis of teacher-student interactions in the piano lessons of adults and children. Journal of Research in Music Education, 45, 6-20. [pdf]