Collaborative Research Seminar Series

The Collaborative Research Seminar Series brings noted scientists working in related disciplines of psychology, neuroscience, physiology, and kinesiology to share their current research with faculty and students in the School of Music. These seminars are the first step in developing collaborative relationships with colleagues who are working to learn more about the processes of human learning.

SEMINAR SPEAKERS

6-7 April 2015

Jayne M. Standley, PhD, Ella Scoble Opperman and Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Music Therapy, The Florida State University

Jayne M. Standley, Ph.D., MT-BC, NICU-MT is a Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor at The Florida State University and the Ella Scoble Opperman Professor of Music with a courtesy appointment in the College of Medicine. Standley’s research area is music therapy for developmental care of premature infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. She is the author of 9 books and numerous refereed journal articles and is former editor of the Journal of Music Therapy.  Standley directs the Music Therapy academic program at FSU, the clinical Medical MT and Arts in Medicine Programs in partnership with Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Tallahassee, and the National Institute for Infant and Child Medical Music Therapy. Dr. Standley has received the Publication, Merit, and Lifetime Achievement Awards from the American Music Therapy Association and Florida State University honors of Distinguished Researcher, Named Professor, Lawton Professor, and multiple teaching awards. Standley is recognized internationally as the foremost authority on medical music therapy and use of music for infant neurodevelopment. Researching the effect of music on premature babies, she found that they increased their suckling rates 2.5 times when exposed to music, thus  leading to improved feeding skills and earlier discharge. Her research led Standley to develop a musical pacifier device that has received a U.S. patent and been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.   Standley's work with preemies also led to the establishment of most of the musical protocols used in hospital neonatal units throughout the world today.

Standley is recognized internationally as the foremost authority on medical music therapy and use of music for infant neurodevelopment. Researching the effect of music on premature babies, or "preemies," she found that they increased their suckling rates 2.5 times when exposed to music, thus  leading to improved feeding skills and earlier discharge. Her research led Standley to develop a musical pacifier device that has received a U.S. patent and been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.   Standley's work with preemies also led to the establishment of most of the musical protocols used in hospital neonatal units throughout the world today

Residency Schedule

Monday 7 April

9:30 AM  Pre-lecture refreshments, ground floor, MRH

10:00-11:30 AM  Lecture: The Music Path: Wiring Neural Circuits in the Infant and Fetal Brain

2:00-3:30 PM  Meeting with students, MRH 2.615

 

Past Seminar Speakers

Laurel M. Trainor, PhDProfessor of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behavior, and Director of the McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind, McMaster University

Matthew P. Walker, PhD, Associate Professor and Director of the Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory, The University of California, Berkeley

Lawrence Abraham, PhD, Professor of Kinesiology, Institute for Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin

John M. Geringer, PhD, Lewis V. Pankaskie Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Music Research, The Florida State University

Clifford K. Madsen, PhD, Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Music Education and Music Therapy, The Florida State University

Timothy Schallert, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Institute for Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin

Lawrence M. Parsons, PhD, Professor and Chair of Cognitive Psychology, University of Sheffield, UK

David Birdsong, PhD, Associate Professor of French and Italian, The University of Texas at Austin

Charles M. Shea, PhD, Professor of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University—College Station

Alison Preston, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin

Bharath Chandrasekaran, PhD, Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin